The vastness of space  

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Page3
Trusted Member
Joined:7 months  ago
Posts: 69
19/06/2017 5:04 am  

Do we really comprehend how vast space really is? We all know by now that our solar system is just a spec within "space". Yeah it's a spec, no more than that.

It is estimated that it would take about a year to get from the earth to Mars. (give or take a few months). But, Mars is by our back door so to speak, compared to Neptune or Pluto. I am not sure about the exact distance, but they are about 25 times further away from earth than Mars is. And here, we're only in our own solar system, a spec in the universe.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration determined in 2013 that the universe is infinite in size.
The part of the universe that we can observe spans 92 billion light years and a light year is 5.9 trillion miles. It really is hard to fathom.

Besides that part of the universe that we can observe, there is so much more out there that was can not observe. In a way, the word infinite is hard to grasp in itself.
Unless we invent a super fast space vehicle that can travel many light years per second, we won't be exploring anything beyond our own galaxy.

 


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IamGroot
Eminent Member
Joined:8 months  ago
Posts: 24
23/06/2017 3:48 pm  

I've heard that a reasonable trip from Earth to Mars would take only 6 to 7 months each way, plus the time you spend on Mars. For trips between stars, you'd have to get used to either getting there slowly and possibly your grandkids or great-grandkids will be the ones to make it to the other star, or putting up with massive time dilation and the possibility that you'll be sending radio messages back to the grandkids of those who built and equipped the spacecraft for you by the time you get to the other star. If your interest is in colonizing planets around other stars, though, you might not care as much because Earth will be the world you left behind. So I wouldn't necessarily say that warp drive is essential for travel to other stars, but it will require getting used to the idea that the achievement of great goals could take more than a generation or two.

There are people talking about making the human species immortal, though. That might help. Think of the things we could do if we didn't have to worry about dying, or at least could choose the time, place and circumstances of our death.


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Page3
Trusted Member
Joined:7 months  ago
Posts: 69
25/06/2017 3:38 am  

There are people talking about making the human species immortal, though. That might help. Think of the things we could do if we didn't have to worry about dying, or at least could choose the time, place and circumstances of our death.

That would be a major asset in space colonization. Imagine the possibilities this would open up. Even if we could add 50 or 100 years to our lives, it would help.

As things are now, space colonists would have to start young, depending on where they want to make a colony. I still think that a colony somewhere in space, but not on any planet, or moon, or anywhere, just loos, like the international space station, would be the best way to go. You'd be able to stay closer to earth, it would be much easier and faster to build the colony, and so on.. The cost would be a whole lot less also. Let's not forget that the cost is among the things that hold us back to go full speed ahead.

With the technology we currently have, I can't imagine a space colony outside our solar system.  Indeed, we'd never grow old enough to get there in decent time.

Time and distance will always be against us, unless we find a way to deal with them, and at this moment, we haven't found that way just yet.

I still hope to live ling enough to see at least some colonization in space happen.


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